Recinto Universitario de Mayagüez Programa de Alerta y Mitigación Contra Maremotos de Puerto Rico FEMA (Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias)
SPACE
TSUNAMI GALLERY
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Shikotan, Kurile Islands, tsunami of October 4, 1994: Along this small river the Tsunami penetrated with a 6-7 meter wave, 600 meters inland. Notice the color change where the tsunami runup reached.

Kunashil, Kurile Islands, tsunami of October 4, 1994:  This house was moved up the river by the tsunami. The small bridge shown also took the same trip.

Lituya bay, Alaska, July 9, 1958: Site of the largest tsunami ever recorded in modern times. More accurately referred to as a Mega-Tsunami due to the gigantic scale of the event. This tsunami was caused by a colossal landslide. The maximum tsunami run-up measured was 576 meters on the opposite side of the landslide area. The rest of the bay suffered run-ups in excess of 100 meters. All vegetation, including full grown pine trees were stripped by the tsunami, leaving a washed rocky surface.

This picture is also from the Lituya bay tsunami, Alaska, July 9, 1958: Here you can distinguish the area were the run-up passed the 500 meter mark, close to the glacier. There is very little preparation if any for an event like this, since landslide occur without warning. 

Lituya bay tsunami, Alaska, July 9, 1958: This time a closer look at the landslide impact zone.

Lituya bay tsunami, Alaska, July 9, 1958: This view shows the devastation caused by the mega-tsunami along the full area of the bay. Notice that both shores, left and right suffered run-ups in the hundreds of meters. 

 
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